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Addition, 1754-1800, to the Richardson Family
        Papers
  
    A gift to SCL Manuscripts Division announced in 2008

| Manuscripts Gifts 2008 | Front Page 2008 | Previous Issues | Friends of the Library |

Seven items, 3 April 1754-12 April 1800 augment the Library’s collection of manuscript materials relating to the Richardson family, chiefly through papers documenting land owned by Richard, John, and William Richardson in old Craven County, S.C., on the south side of the Wateree River.

A notable transaction is the 4 January 1785 conveyance of real estate from William Richardson (1743-1786) and Ann (1750-1810), his wife, of Camden District, S.C. to John Rutledge (1739-1800) of Charleston for eleven hundred pounds sterling. Rutledge purchased for that sum two plantations in Craven County on the south side of the Wateree River, one consisting of three hundred acres and the other of one hundred fifty acres. Besides bounding on the river and vacant lands, the former tract was bordered on one side by land of James Michie, while the latter tract was bordered by a Mr. Brown. The seals of William and Ann Guignard Richardson are still intact. Because William Richardson died the following year, his handwriting was later verified by Gen. Zachariah Cantey (1759-1882). Witnesses to the document were Elizabeth Fley and Isham Moore. However, it was not “sworn to and subscribed” until 2 February 1809, by which time Elizabeth Fley had become Elizabeth Ioor.

Also appearing in the collection is a 10 January 1784 letter from William Richardson to Col. Joseph Kershaw (1727-1791) requesting a meeting to deliver titles to lots in the town of Camden, S.C., from Col. Joseph Habersham (1751-1815), “in conformity to your agreement with him of the 2d May 1783. I have to request that you will appoint a time and place to receive them, this evening if convenient as I wish to depart tomorrow morning. Some of your late conduct which has come to my knowledge puts it totally out of my power to wait on you at your house so that you’ll excuse my desiring a meeting for the above purpose.”

| Manuscripts Gifts 2008 | Previous Issues | Endowments | Friends of the Library |

 

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