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Letter, 21 Dec. 1838, from John Blount Miller to
        Samuel L. Hinckley
  
    A gift to SCL Manuscripts Division announced in 2008

| Manuscripts Gifts 2008 | Front Page 2008 | Previous Issues | Friends of the Library |

Letter, 21 December 1838, of John B[lount] Miller, Sumterville [Sumter, S.C.], addressed to Samuel L. Hinckley, Northampton, Massachusetts, discusses family business and legal affairs with his nephew and niece, including the marriage of portrait artist William Harrison Scarborough (1812-1871), and adds to an cache of correspondence between Miller and Hinckley in the South Caroliniana Library’s collection of papers of the Miller, Furman, and Dabbs families.

This letter suggests that Miller had written previously to suggest that Henrietta, who apparently was expecting a child, prepare a will. “My object in mentioning the subject of a will to my dear Henrietta was not to give her any uneasiness or to improperly interfer[e] in her private affairs but only to call to her notice the matter & to suggest the propriety of making some provision for her Mother & Brother in case of her death which I trust will not happen in my day.”

After discussing other business matters, including dividends on U.S. Bank stock, Miller turns his attention to news of his own family. “My son William,” he wrote, “was married on the 14th Nov. last to Miss Louisa Eliz[abet]h DuBose & my daughter Miranda to Mr. Wm H Scarbrough on the 28th Nov. William is keeping house in Sumterville. Miranda has gone to Darlington. John is in D. in a store. Martha is there on a visit so we have only Thomas James & Susan with us we are lonely.”

In closing, Miller again alludes to his concern over Henrietta’s affairs should she die intestate. “The instance of H. decease leaving a child & that C. dieying without issue & unmarried the father takes if there is no Brother or sister....I shall feel anxious to hear from you...do write me but more especially after H. aucouchment.”

| Manuscripts Gifts 2008 | Previous Issues | Endowments | Friends of the Library |

 

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