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Addition, 1780 and 1788, to Wade Hampton
        Papers
  
    A gift to SCL Manuscripts Division announced in 2008

| Manuscripts Gifts 2008 | Front Page 2008 | Previous Issues | Friends of the Library |

Two letters, 12 Ap[ri]l 1780 and 18 March 1788, written by Wade Hampton (1752-1835) to Thomas Rutledge and Seaborn Jones, respectively, form an addition to the Hampton family papers.

The first, written from “Biggon Church” [i.e. Biggin Church, in St. John's Parish (Berkeley County, S.C.)] to Rutledge in Charleston, S.C., discusses attempts by Hampton to transport flour for the army by boats and wagons. He informs Rutledge that “all the waggons that can be spared from Genl. [William] Woodford’s Briggade shall be imployed in getting down the Flour to Canehoy. But...the Boat cannot be down so soon as we expected on account of an accident that happen’d her in taking her to the Landing.” He goes on to assure Rutledge that “as soon as any of the Boats arrive at Lenud’s Ferry, I shall be on the spot, & will apply for the waggons, which...are near that place.” Hampton concludes by describing a boat “Lodged in Santee Loaded for Camden” which he can have at Lenud’s Ferry loaded with flour in ten to twelve days as it “cannot be of any service to the owner, as the Hands are Run away.”

The second letter, from Hampton to Seaborn Jones, discusses an apparent land dispute involving the former. He tells Jones that “I have very suff[icien]t Gen[er]al Warrantee Titles from McQueen for those Lands - but those from the Heirs of Fitch to him are not in my possession. I presume they are in his; being left with him, perhaps to be recorded, - for my Titles have particular reference to those.” Hampton informs Jones that he had examined the conveyances to McQueen from “George Rout, & Peter Bacott who married the only Daughter (or Grand-Daughter) of Mrs. Fitch,” but assumes that it would not “be possible for us to be ready for tryal this Court.” He concludes by asking Jones to write him when “you think we shall, and I will make a point of attending.”

| Manuscripts Gifts 2008 | Previous Issues | Endowments | Friends of the Library |

 

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