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Letter, 6 Aug. 1845, from Josiah James Evans to
        Abel E. Evans
  
    A gift to SCL Manuscripts Division announced in 2008

| Manuscripts Gifts 2008 | Front Page 2008 | Previous Issues | Friends of the Library |

Letter, 6 August 1845, from Josiah J[ames] Evans, Society Hill (Darlington County, S.C.), to Abel E. Evans, Camden P[ost] O[ffice], Alabama, responds to news of “your negroes being sold,” counseling that “we have to submit to our destiny and should do so with resignation & patience” and supposing that “in consequence of this your plantation is of but little value to you and you are therefore right to sell it.”

Josiah Evans further offers the use of any of his lands there should they prove useful to Abel Evans and notes that he was “much obliged to you for what you have done in securing me the title.” The land, he goes on to say, “turned out but a sorry speculation & the money it lost with other large amounts I have had to pay for security since has so much involved me that I have been & still am wholly unable to assist you in your difficulties which I have much desired to do.”

“I hope the sale of your negroes has not stript you of all of them,” the writer notes. “I should be glad if you will send me a statement of your affairs, the number of negroes left & the probable amount for which your land can be sold & your prospective arrangements.”

The letter closes with news of family, crop conditions, and Josiah Evans’ own health and welfare: “I am beginning to feel some of the infirmities of age & if I could afford it would retire from my official station. But the low price of cotton renders the production of the plantation insufficient without the addition of my salary to meet my engagements. I find economy of the strictest sort necessary to meet my contracts from year to year....The drought has been very severe & our corn crops will be very short. The cotton has not been much injured. My own is infe[rior] to what it has been for some years but in general the crop is as good as usual.”

| Manuscripts Gifts 2008 | Previous Issues | Endowments | Friends of the Library |

 

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