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Letter, 5 Dec. 1846 (Charleston, S.C.), from John
        Anderson, to Dr. James Morrow
  
    A gift to SCL Manuscripts Division announced in 2008

| Manuscripts Gifts 2008 | Front Page 2008 | Previous Issues | Friends of the Library |

Letter , 5 Dec[ember] [18]46, from Jno. [John] Anderson, Charleston, S.C., to Dr. James Morrow, Bordeaux P[ost] O[ffice], Abbeville Dist[rict], S.C., provided a vehicle for the discussion of two young medical professionals’ respective amorous interests in light of the social mores of that day.

Anderson reminds Morrow just how much he has been missed since leaving Charleston and queries what his friend’s intentions might be - “If it be your interest & better success for the future to leave us for the present, I shall be the better reconciled at my loss in giving you up, but still I cannot but wish that it was otherwise. If you determine to take to your bosom the sweet young Lady of whom mention is made in your letter, I wish you well & hope a full share of happiness may be yours....”

Anderson then turns to a lengthy discussion of his own unrequited admiration for a young lady identified only as “the loved one,” confiding to his friend humorous details of a visit in her home. “I called some two weeks after you & I were there & certainly met with a warm family reception, as you may know by my forgetting myself & staying until 1/4 past 11 o’cl[ock] a point on which you particularly cautioned me. The truth is the time slipped away before I was aware. I went the next day & desired the Old Gentleman to apologize to the Ladies for my staying, but he laughed it off & said he did not regard the hour as late.”

“The truth is,” Anderson confessed, “that abominable possibility that she may be engaged, growing out of the report to that effect, tends to throw a damper over my hopes, for it would crush my affections most sadly were I to receive a rebuff from that quarter.” He had not seen her on his last visit with her family and had missed “several fine opportunities of late to walk home with her”; consequently, “I now feel blue all over, spirits much depressed, I feel like, I feel like I don’t know how I feel, but just like I would not feel if I was sure of my affection being returned.” Even so, he vowed, it was his express intention “to turn over a new leaf...& make a spoon or spoil a horn as is sometimes said.”

| Manuscripts Gifts 2008 | Previous Issues | Endowments | Friends of the Library |

 

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