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Philip A. Warner Papers, 13 Sept. and
   26 Nov. 1863

| Manuscripts Gifts 2006 | Front Page 2006 | Previous Issues | Friends of the Library |

Two Civil War letters, 13 Sept[ember] and 26 November 1863, of Union soldier Philip A. Warner, a private in Co. K, 3rd New Hampshire Volunteers, were written from Morris Island, South Carolina, to his father, Andrew S. Warner, in North Hampton, New Hampshire, and describe the bombardment of Fort Sumter and siege of Charleston in late 1863.

“It has been sixty seven Day’s since our Battries opend fire from Folly Island onto Morris, and we have just completed the capture of Fort’s Wagner and Greg with the loss of a great many live’s,” Warner writes in the earlier letter. General Gillmore’s men had constructed batteries and rifle pits, working all the while “under a heavy fire from the rebels from Sumter Wagner Greg and battries on James Island,” and had then “opend on Sumter and the bombardment was kep up untill the Fort was broken to pecies and of no yuse what ever.”

The Union troops had then turned their attention to batteries Wagner and Gregg, and since those fortifications were now in their possession, Warner reported, “we are mounting heavy Gun’s on Wagner and Greg probely to demolish Sumter still more and make it surender.” Nevertheless, he advised, “Peopel north nead not be in a hurry about takeing Charleston for it will be sometime before it is taken. Fort Sumter is not but a small thing towards takeing Charleston. some of the papers I have seen think because Fort Sumter is nocked to peacies that our troops can walk into the City without eny trobel but it is not so for Gillmore has got to take every inch of ground he goes over.”

The second letter notes that Thanksgiving was being celebrated among the troops, but “I suppose you will enjoy yourself a great deal better than I shall in some respects, and while I am thinking of Home and the Dear one’s their you are thinking of the Soldier in the Field and you can feel thankfull that you have Two Son’s fighting for their Country.”

Warner hoped that Union forces would soon be in control of Charleston, “but I cannot tell how long it will be. I understand a forward movement is to be made soon as an order of that effect has arrived from the war Department at Washington lately. All that thay have been wateing for is some new Iron Clad’s and I understand that one of Two of them have arived already.” He further speculates that “Sumter can be taken at any time when the Govt choose’s to do so, but is has got to be taken by a charge, for our Battries have stove it to peases so thay cannot do no more good.” The letter concludes with Warner’s observation that “Charleston is doomb shure this time all though it is well fortifide more so then eny other place in the South” and words of praise for Gen. Quincy Gillmore - “he is the right man in the right place.”

| Manuscripts Gifts 2006 | Previous Issues | Endowments | Friends of the Library |

 

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