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Letter, 31 Dec. 1852 (Cass County, [Texas]), from
   William R. Myers to Andrew Baxter Springs,
   Fort Mill (York District, S.C.)
  

| Manuscripts Gifts 2006 | Front Page 2006 | Previous Issues | Friends of the Library |

Letter discussing one family's experience of migration from South Carolina to the Old Southwest during later antebellum period.

Letter, 31 Dec[ember] 1852, of W[illia]m R. Myers, Cass County, [Texas], to A[ndrew] B[axter] Springs, Fort Mill, York District, South Carolina, describes the former having taken a “colony” to Texas from South Carolina via railroad and steamboat.

Begging Springs’ pardon for not having called to see him in Columbia, S.C., before departing South Carolina, Myers writes, “You will recollect that at that time Columbia was very much crowded, it being commencement, and the Hotels completely overrun, so much so, I ascertained that it was impossible for our colony to hope for accommodation. We were, therefore, from necessity, compelled to take the night train for Hamburg [S.C.].”

Myers and company had been forced to stop over at Augusta and Atlanta, Ga., but otherwise “got on tolerably well, without meeting with any adventure worth narrating till we got to Montgomery.” From there they traveled on “a most magnificent steamboat” - “I can tell you this made the boys open their eyes. They Considered this as full compensation for the trouble & expense of coming to Texas, even should they not be pleased with the Country.” Myers continues, “On our arrival in New Orleans,” where they were delayed for three days awaiting a lake boat, Myers notes, “the boys had the big eye. They had seen the elephant to use their own expression.”

Ultimately the entourage had a quick and pleasant trip up the river in company “with quite a crowd of emigrants...bound for Texas.” Luckily, there were few health complaints and no cholera; however, after their arrival “we lost one of the little negroes, Leahs youngest child.”

| Manuscripts Gifts 2006 | Previous Issues | Endowments | Friends of the Library |

 

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