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Letter, 11 Aug. 1861, (Edgefield, S.C.) from Lewis
     Jones to Col. Tho[m]as G. Bacon
     (Manassas Junction, Virginia)
  

| Manuscripts Gifts 2006 | Front Page 2006 | Previous Issues | Friends of the Library |

Letter, 11 August 1861, written by Lewis Jones (1815-1892) from Edgefield C[ourt] H[ouse], South Carolina, to his friend Col. Tho[m]as G. Bacon, the first commander of the 7th South Carolina Volunteers, at Manassas Junction, Virginia, updates Bacon on the homefront situation, including crop conditions and other economic issues and the state of affairs with regard to horse racing.

Jones was recuperating from a riding accident, “the first time in my life, that I have been hurt to any extent by a horse,” and reported having seen Mrs. Bacon, who was having the couple’s race horse “given light exercise, just sufficient to keep him in good health.” Sadly, Jones noted, “I have heard of no racing to come off this winter, nor do I suppose there will be any until the war is over.”

“In regard to money matters, the like you have never seen before in Edgefield,” the letter reports, “there has been a total suspension in all matters of business, except the agricultural,” and “even the offices of court so far as business is concerned had almost as well be closed.” Business was so sluggish that Jones thought “it would be a relief...to be able to get away from this dull place and go to some other where I could mingle with others of my friends and countrymen in defence of my country.” Three more companies had been organized, with “some two or three more in course of organization from this district,” and he expected this his brother James would be elected colonel of the next regiment organized “as he has indicated that he will accept if elected.”

The letter concludes with a veiled reference to Bacon having “been badly treated” by his regiment- “the best treatment for such cases… is stern and lofty contempt, never allowing the parties to approach within a stones throw of you, except under the strictest rule of of[f]icial duty” - and the fact that rumors were circulating about Edgefield that he had been killed in a duel, “but no intelligent person believes it.”

| Manuscripts Gifts 2006 | Previous Issues | Endowments | Friends of the Library |

 

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