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James Hayden Letters, 1 Aug. 1820
      and 3 Aug. 1830
  

| Manuscripts Gifts 2006 | Front Page 2006 | Previous Issues | Friends of the Library |

Two letters, 1 Aug[ust] 1820 and 3 August 1830, were penned by James Hayden from Abbeville and Laurens Court House, South Carolina. The earlier letter gives an account of the death of “our dear friend Hubbard,” noting that he was buried “in a yard enclosed where the deceased of the family of Mr Adams and some others now lie about thirty eight Rods from my Store.” It also comments that the store was not selling as many goods as it had the previous year.

The subsequent letter, written from Laurens, S.C., and addressed to James Hayden’s brother Allen, conveys brotherly advice regarding children’s duties to parents and counseling his sibling against a plan to remove to Maryland, “unless you have some more flattering prospects than is described in your letter I should not think it advisable and further as Father has no one to help him but yourself I think you had better remain with him till next spring at which time… I shall see you and if you will do the best you can on the farm and try and get all the learning you can next winter I think I can put you in some more favourable way of getting a living than your Maryland trip promises.” The message to Allen concludes with a reference to the drought in South Carolina - “no rain in eight weeks past” - and the fact that the resulting agricultural crop would be poor- “we shall not make this year more than one third of a common crop.”

The letter of 3 August 1830 also contains a message to sister Clarissa, again conveying advice on her teaching work and her desire to further her education at Ashfield Academy. It concludes with this postscript - “if you should think of forming an alliance I trust you will select an Ally worth having otherwise you had better be single handed even in war.”

| Manuscripts Gifts 2006 | Previous Issues | Endowments | Friends of the Library |

 

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