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Col. Oliver James Bond Papers, 1818-1933   

| Manuscripts Gifts 2006 | Front Page 2006 | Previous Issues | Friends of the Library |

Forty-five manuscripts 1818-1933, of Col. Oliver James Bond (1865-1933), Superintendent and President of The Citadel, 1908-1931, consist largely of genealogical information on the Wayne and allied families. A detailed family history, illustrated and prepared by Bond for his granddaughter Mary Ellen in 1923, is included.

Among the earlier items is a 21 September 1837 letter from F[rancis] A[sbury] Wayne to "Brother Ebby" recounting the death of a beloved family matriarch and conveying other news of crops, weather, and a potential land transaction. This letter is noteworthy for its spiritual imagery, "If in her situation a retrospective pause be thrown o’er busy thought, connected with a prospective view penetrating through a vista of the future reigns of time, what solemn emotions would fill the soul...to see bone of our bone flesh of our flesh in lengthened line or grouped in spiral forms in congregated clusters clothed in brilliant white and with perpetual spring, well settled with eternal mansions each provided with celestial food where degradation has no haunt, degeneracy no place...."

An excerpt, 18 February 1864, transcribed from the diary of Catherine Wayne Chrietzberg places the aforementioned quote into context and includes a brief family history recounted to Mrs. Chrietzberg by her father, Francis Asbury Wayne. He speaks of the life of his father, the Rev. William Wayne, who was orphaned at a young age and lived with his uncle Isaac and cousin Anthony, the future Revolutionary War luminary "Mad Anthony" Wayne. "I have heard him say that when General Wayne and himself were boys that they had a fight in which he whipped the General badly, who went crying for his father, who only said ‘never mind...you’ll make a warrior before you die.’" The diary extract also recounts the dramatic religious conversion of William Wayne. At age fifty he began to preach despite ridicule and persecution. Eventually, with the help of Bishop Francis Asbury, he helped found the first Methodist church in Georgetown, S.C., and was a devout minister for the remaining thirty years of his life.

A 13 Feb[ruary 19]12 letter written by Capt. Oliver James Bond III to his mother, Mary Roach Bond, reveals that the young man was stationed at that time near Panama as an aide in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. It solicits news of recent graduates and friends and recounts something of military life and his personal observations of Panama.

Two letters touch on the younger Bond’s abiding interest in the game of chess. A letter written on 29 April 1930 by fellow chess aficionado James Henry Rice, Jr., recounts the moves in a recent match and laments the fact that the current generation of chess players no longer revered the memory of great American champion Paul Morphy (1837-1884). Bond helped found the South Carolina Chess Club and was state champion in 1928. E.L. Dashiell, the 1933 state champion, wrote on 7 July 1933 recounting the results of a chess match, possibly the match in which he won the title. The election of officers and a tournament between the upcountry and low country are also discussed.

| Manuscripts Gifts 2006 | Previous Issues | Endowments | Friends of the Library |

 

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