logo of university of south carolina
SOUTH CAROLINIANA LIBRARY
UNIVERSITY SOUTH CAROLINIANA SOCIETY
MANUSCRIPTS DIVISION 2001
| 2001 Gifts to Manuscripts | Front Page | Previous Issues | Manuscripts Division | Newsletters |
| USCAN | South Caroliniana Library | USC | Search USC web |
Letter, 13 January 1845, of C. Scott, Adams Run, to Charles Buchanan, New Vernon, Orange County, N.Y.
Letter, 13 January 1845, of C. Scott, Adams Run, to Charles Buchanan, New Vernon, Orange County, N.Y., pictures in detail the "small pine-land village" of Adams Run, "situated about 25 miles to the South West of the city of Charleston."

A New York Teacher in Charleston County, S.C.:

To read the full text of this letter dated 13 January 1845, see
Caroliniana Columns, Autumn 2000 edition.

Scott, a Northern school teacher who had arrived in Charleston on 18 December 1844, his twenty-second birthday, following a sea voyage from New York, includes information on the houses, surrounding countryside, and his daily diet of sweet potatoes and hominy. "These villages are scattered throughout the low-land country and are the summer resorts of the neighboring planters," wrote Scott. "It is very dangerous to reside throughout the warm months on the rice and cotton plantations....Consequently, in the month of May, nearly all the planters leave their estates and take up their residences for a few months in more healthy localities. Most of them seek some favourable pine ridge, which is quite elevated, dry, sandy and sterile and which is sufficiently near their plantation to enable them to ride thither once or twice a week....A few trees are cleared away affording just sufficient room for a house from ten to twenty of which constitute a village-a pine land village."

The writer further noted that these summer residences were typically whitewashed and constructed with exterior chimneys of clay rather than brick. "I am told that Adams Run is a very good specimen of the sort. It contains twenty dwellings beside negro houses, all of them elevated from 6 to 10 feet above the ground and supported by wooden props, and some of them are two stories high and look very neatly indeed on the outside. But they are simply enclosed and partitioned into rooms and have no ceilings within, either of lime & plaster or of boards."

Scott had been in South Carolina too short a time "to hazard any opinion concerning the manners and customs of the people" but reported-"The Southern people are noted for their generosity and hospitality and although somewhat reserved at first they soon welcome the stranger and make him feel as if a stranger no longer. Already have I received several invitations to visit planters in the neighborhood and as I am free every Saturday, I think that I will soon become acquainted and be able to tell more of the Southern character."


| Top | 2001 Gifts to Manuscripts | Front Page | Manuscripts Division | Newsletters |
| USCAN | South Caroliniana Library | USC | Search USC web |


This page copyright © 2001, The Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina.
URL http://www.sc.edu/library/socar/uscs/2001/scott.html