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SCPC > Collections - Wyche, Charles Cecil (1885-1966)

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Wyche, Charles Cecil (1885-1966)

Papers, 1906-1969, 4 ft.

Charles Cecil Wyche served as the U.S. District Judge for the Western District of South Carolina for almost thirty years. He began his public career by representing Spartanburg County in the South Carolina House of Representatives from 1913 to 1914. He served in the U.S. Army during World War I as a First Lieutenant and later a Major. From 1919 to 1933, he served as city and then county attorney for Spartanburg. In 1924, Wyche was specially appointed associate justice to the South Carolina Supreme Court. Between 1933 and 1937, he served as the U.S. District Attorney for the Western District in South Carolina. He was appointed U.S. District Judge for the Western District on January 30, 1937, and served until the time of his death in 1966.

Collection Finding Aid (pdf, 10 pages)
The collection consists of four linear feet of papers, 1903-1969, arranged in six series: Judicial Papers, Topical Files, Personal, Speeches, Clippings, and Photographs.  The collection as a whole consists largely of correspondence – letters to and from Judge Wyche on a number of topics, both quotidian and unique. From letters he wrote to his mother while at The Citadel, to letters to and from other judges, to letters of condolence to his secretary, Mrs. Frances D. Staples, upon the Judge’s death in 1966, the scope and content of the collection are rich and varied. Correspondents of note include fellow judges George Bell Timmerman and Ashton Williams, as well as hundreds of prison inmates seeking to reduce or appeal their sentences.

Related Collection:
Charles Cecil Wyche Papers, 1902-1924 (Duke University 9,736 items)

Related Link:

Memory Hold the Door   (USC Law School)