MIRC ACE

2009 Winner

Jarid Munsch Jarid Munsch, MIRC ACE Winner

Columbia native Jarid Munsch has won the first Award for Creative Editing (ACE) conferred by Moving Image Research Collections (MIRC). The award celebrates innovative use of archival film footage for an editing exercise in MART 371: The Moving Image. MART 371 introduces University of South Carolina undergraduates to all aspects of film and video production.

For the assignment, Professors Laura Kissel and Jennifer Tarr selected approximately forty minutes of archival material from the Fox Movietone News Collection. From this material, each student was asked to assemble a film of about a minute in length. Each instructor set guidelines designed to cultivate aesthetic principles of editing and to develop technical skills in working with nonlinear editing software.

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“Using MIRC footage allowed us to achieve some learning objectives and skills development in the course,” said Professor Kissel, “but it simultaneously enabled us to introduce students to one of the marvelous film collections housed at the University of South Carolina.” That made a difference for Munsch. He had known that MIRC existed prior to the assignment but had not appreciated the scope of the collections and their openness to student use. “To have archival material on everything from Eleanor Roosevelt to long-bow archery tutorials is special,” Munsch  observed. “Student filmmakers should take every opportunity to sift through the reels.” 

A unit of the University Libraries, MIRC welcomes use of its collections. “Media producers worldwide have drawn inspiration from the collections,” noted Interim Director Mark Cooper. “It’s only right that the archive should nurture talent in our own backyard.” Located at 707 Catawba St., MIRC is open to the public Monday through Friday from 9 to 5. Over 3000 hours of rare archival material are available to view on videocassette and DVD.

MIRC’s staff selected Munsch’s film from among six finalists chosen by Kissel and Tarr. “Each of the films struck a chord with someone on the panel,” Cooper explained, “but Munsch’s archery piece was clearly the consensus favorite.” Kissel credited the film with “creating a dynamic experience through both the visual and aural track,” and added that Munsch “played around with time and space in a very interesting way.”  Munsch said he chose the footage because the soundtrack interested him as much as the images and because “the archery just seemed fun.”

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