The Diplomatic Life…continued

Recently Lori wrote about our latest exhibit, “The Diplomatic Life,” and how it depicts the various functions and facets of diplomatic service as documented by six of our collections.  These include the papers of James P. Richards, Paul Kattenburg, Rita Derrick Hayes, John West, Richard “Dixie” Walker, and David Wilkins.

All of these individuals played slightly different roles in the diplomatic sphere.  The latter three were in a role familiar to the general public, that of ambassador–although they served in widely varied times and places.  The other forms of diplomatic work displayed in the exhibit might be a little less visible or straightforward, but no less important.  This was the case for the other three individuals highlighted: Richards, Kattenburg, and Hayes.

Richards served as a special presidential envoy to the Middle East in the 1950s, and Kattenburg had a lengthy and distinguished career in the U.S. Foreign Service.  Also documented is the service of Hayes, who represented the United States in the realm of trade policy, via the World Trade Organization and the World Intellectual Property Organization.  Here are a few items from the exhibit from their respective collections.

An Arabic news article detailing James P. Richards' arrival in Beirut, Lebanon.  January 17, 1957.

An Arabic news article detailing James P. Richards’ arrival in Beirut, Lebanon, circa January 17, 1957. Richards served as Special Assistant to President Eisenhower for the Middle East from January 1957 to January 1958.

Richards at one of his destinations as an envoy.  These included Ethiopia, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon, Morocco, Tripoli and Turkey, among other countries. He also traveled to Formosa (Taiwan) and Malaya.

Richards at one of his destinations as an envoy. These included Ethiopia, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon, Morocco, Libya, and Turkey. He also traveled to Formosa (Taiwan) and Malaya. Richards’ years of experience on the House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Committee gave him the expertise for his diplomatic assignment.

Paul Kattenburg in one of his diplomatic postings in East Asia.

Paul Kattenburg in one of his diplomatic postings in East Asia.

 

An official review of Kattenburg's work by the State Department, 1946.  A number of documents on display show the intricate paperwork involved in a long-term diplomatic career such as his.

An official review of Kattenburg’s work by the State Department, 1946. A number of documents on display show the intricate paperwork involved in a long-term diplomatic career such as his.

President Clinton commends Rita Derrick Hayes on her work in his administration.  In 1996, Clinton had awarded her the rank of Ambassador for her service.

President Clinton commends Rita Derrick Hayes on her work in his administration. In 1996, Clinton had awarded her the rank of Ambassador for her service.

 

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South Carolina Political Collections hosts congressional archivists

I want to thank everyone on the University Libraries team who worked so well together to present a highly successful and memorable 11th Annual Meeting of Association of Centers for the Study of Congress from May 14 to May 16.

The conference drew 42 congressional archivists, library administrators and congressional staff to Columbia. As we work in a Hollings-centric universe, we were pleased to see folks responsible for the papers of Hollings’ mentor, Richard Russell of Georgia; his mentee, Joe Biden of Delaware: and close friends, Daniel Inouye of Hawaii, Ted Stevens of Alaska, and Chris Dodd of Connecticut.

SCPC is gaining a reputation as an incubator of future archival leaders and we were proud to see two former SCPC student assistants on the program, Laura Litwer of Texas A&M Commerce and Debbie Todd of Baylor’s Poage Library.

The program opened with a keynote address delivered by former Democratic National Party chair Don Fowler. Seven panels considered the work of congressional chiefs of staff, campaign managers, innovative outreach, recent books and documentaries, the future of congressional archives, and “bridge” collections (non-legislative collections like League of Women Voters & political cartoonists). In addition, two former members of Congress spoke about their experiences having their papers collected. Program participants included our own Lori Schwartz;  former Hollings chiefs of staff Joey Lesesne and David Rudd; Floyd Spence chief of staff Craig Metz, whose dead-on impersonation of Strom Thurmond made him a favorite of the audience; campaign manager Jamal Gunn; Bryan Dorn biographer Jack Roper; and USC Professor of Library and Information Science Jennifer Marshall.

Attendees received a tour of SCPC and we were surprised that the one thing the group seemed most enamored of was our two-case exhibit just outside our processing area illustrating the steps in processing a major collection. We copied the concept from the Dole Institute and it sounds like the exhibit will soon be replicated at a number of our sister institutions. (For photos of the exhibit, please see our earlier blog post at http://library.sc.edu/blogs/scpc/2010/10/12/behind-the-scenes-level-5-exhibits/.)

Special thanks to Christine Nicol-Morris; Rob Smith; Dorothy Walker, who serves as Secretary of ACSC; Lori Schwartz; and Dean of Libraries Tom McNally, who encouraged and made possible our hosting this conference. We began planning for this years ago, when we first learned we would be moving to a new state-of-the-art facility. The meeting was all we expected it to be and certainly solidified our standing as a leading congressional repository.

Contributed by Herb Hartsook

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Congressman Jim Clyburn publishes memoir

Allen Anderson, Photographer: Clyburn Book Signing 14050501 &emdash; AA_258

Photo by Allen Anderson

Congressman Jim Clyburn spoke on Monday, May 5 at the Hollings Library about his new memoir entitled “Blessed Experiences:  Genuinely Southern, Proudly Black.”  Clyburn has been working on the book for almost 20 years, and he described the process he went through in naming the book.  The original title was “I, Too Am a Southerner.”  This working title came about after a discussion Clyburn had years ago with Phil Grose, his longtime friend and collaborator on the book.  An unnamed politician had made a racially offensive comment, and when Clyburn confronted him later privately, his explanation, meant to excuse the offensive comment, was that he was “a southerner.”  In a later discussion about this incident Clyburn and Grose both observed that they were proud to consider themselves and their families to be southerners too.

The current title incorporates the pride that Clyburn and his family hold in having grown up in the south; while also commemorating his father’s favorite hymn, “Blessed Assurance,” which he used to frequently hum around the house.  As Clyburn has said of the title, “All of my experiences were not pleasant, but all of them were blessings.”

A former high school teacher, and proponent of public education, Clyburn said in his speech on Monday that he wanted “every tenth grader to be able to pick [the] book up, understand every word in it, and use it as a primer.”  The event on Monday at the Hollings Library was well-attended with around 130 present, and the crowd was standing room only; many of Clyburn’s family members were present as well.  159 books were sold, exceeding the number of attendees.

Allen Anderson, Photographer: Clyburn Book Signing 14050501 &emdash; AA_009

Mayor Steve Benjamin looks at the Clyburn exhibit. Photo by Allen Anderson.

SCPC donor and longtime political activist Charles T. “Bud” Ferillo introduced Clyburn, and a book-signing followed the speech.  Coinciding with Clyburn’s visit and the book launch is an exhibit about the Congressman which will be on display for the month of May in the Brittain Gallery of the Hollings Library.  Photographs, bumper stickers, newspaper clippings, campaign pamphlets, and buttons document Clyburn’s long and impressive career.

Contributed by Graduate Assistant Mary Kennington Steele

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Butler Carson Derrick, Jr. (1936-2014)

Butler Derrick was a powerful legislator who also provided stellar constituent service, an acute observer of government and politics, and a delightful storyteller.  He won Bryan Dorn’s seat in Congress in 1974 after Mr. Dorn decided to run for Governor rather than seek certain re-election to the House.  Derrick’s service in the House was marked by influence, from his early appointments to the Budget and Rules Committees, to his mid-career service on the Congressional Textile Caucus and the Democratic Steering and Policy Committee, and culminating in his appointment as Chief Deputy Majority Whip.

We approached Derrick immediately on hearing his unexpected February 1994 announcement that he was retiring from the House.   Eventually, I travelled to Washington and met with his staff to determine what should and should not be included in his collection.  I also visited his district offices and, in time, conducted oral history interviews with Mr. Derrick and several long-term staff.  It was my first experience in actually closing a congressional office.  To this day I remain impressed with the people Butler had gathered around him and their loyalty.

Butler Derrick and family and Dr. and Mrs. PalmsI learn something from almost every one of our donors.  Butler taught me about the desire to serve.  Every time I was with him, at some point, he would ask me, “What can I do for you?” or “How can I help you?”  He seemed ill at ease unless I had a favor that he could grant me.

When I think of Butler, I rarely picture him at his office, or in his home, or behind the wheel of a new sports car.  Instead, I think of a painting by his wife Beverly, who is a marvelously talented artist.  It was a hunting scene showing Butler in a field, shotgun in hand and wearing a bright red jacket.  All you saw was Butler’s back, but somehow Beverly’s art allowed her to capture Butler so clearly, that you immediately knew that it was Butler.  He will be sorely missed and my life is so much richer for having known him.

 –Contributed by Herb Hartsook

 

 

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The Diplomatic Life

James P. Richards, 3rd from the left, in Pakistan as special ambassador to the Middle East under President Eisenhower in 1957.

A new exhibit now graces the South Carolina Political Collections gallery.  Experience The Diplomatic Life through September 1st in the Hollings Library.  Here at Political Collections, we have the papers of a lot of congressmen, governors, judges, and so on, but did you know we have the papers of diplomats?  Dorothy and I thought it about time to shine some light on them.

Invitation sent to Rita Derrick Hayes in Geneva.  Ambassador Hayes was Deputy U.S. Trade Representative and U.S. Permanent Representative to the World Trade Organization (WTO) from 1997 to 2001.

Invitation sent to Rita Derrick Hayes in Geneva. Ambassador Hayes was Deputy U.S. Trade Representative and U.S. Permanent Representative to the World Trade Organization (WTO) from 1997 to 2001.

Diplomacy is influenced by representatives in the legislative and executive branches (boy, do we have some congressional travel files we could show you!) but diplomacy is officially the domain of the diplomatic corps: negotiators and delegates, foreign service officers, and ambassadors, all representing their country in a multitude of ways.  In The Diplomatic Life, we attempt to look at this multitude.

Former SC Governor John West with King Khalid of Saudi Arabia. West was U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia from 1977 to 1981.

Former SC Governor John West with King Khalid of Saudi Arabia. West was U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia from 1977 to 1981.

This exhibit examines in brief the careers of six individuals navigating different avenues of American diplomatic service.  We explore the realities and challenges of ambassadorial appointments to Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Canada, and the World Trade Organization, along with a diplomatic career in the U.S. Foreign Service and a unique assignment as a Special Assistant to the President on a Middle East mission in the 1950s.

Every item in this blog post is on display, representing each of the six diplomats.  We want to show you more, though, especially if you can’t visit us in person.  This month and next, we’ll put up posts looking more closely at items in the exhibit and explaining how they represent different facets of a diplomat’s career.

David Wilkins, U.S. Ambassador to Canada from 2005 to 2009, may have been the closest to home of anyone in this exhibit, but as this cover lets on, Canada must have felt like a world away from the beaches of South Carolina.

David Wilkins, U.S. Ambassador to Canada from 2005 to 2009, may have been the closest to home of anyone in this exhibit, but as this cover lets on, Canada must have felt a world away from the beaches back home.

Paul Kattenburg's career in the U.S. Foreign Service began in 1950.  From 1950 to 1962, he and his family lived in Washington, Manila, and Frankfurt.  He eventually became an officer for the State Department’s Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs.  Kattenburg finished his diplomatic career at the Foreign Service Institute’s School of Professional Studies, teaching new Foreign Service workers the trade. Though he performed contract work for the U.S. government for the rest of his life, he officially retired in 1973, taking on a new academic career.

From 1950 to 1962, Paul Kattenburg’s career in the U.S. Foreign Service took him and his family from Washington to Manila to Frankfurt. He eventually became an officer for the State Department’s Bureau of Far Eastern Affairs. He finished his diplomatic career at the Foreign Service Institute’s School of Professional Studies, teaching new Foreign Service workers the trade.

Invitation sent to Richard "Dixie" Walker, U.S. Ambassador to South Korea from 1981 to 1986.

Invitation sent to Richard “Dixie” Walker, U.S. Ambassador to South Korea from 1981 to 1986.  Walker joined the faculty at the University of South Carolina in 1957 and founded the Institute for International Studies in 1961 (renamed for him in 1994).

 

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In the Family Tradition

On April 2, we were delighted to welcome family members of the late Senator Olin Johnston and of Congresswoman Liz Patterson for a tour of our exhibit, “In the Family Tradition: Olin D. Johnston and Elizabeth J. Patterson.”

FamilyIncluded in the party were Senator Johnston’s daughter Sallie and her granddaughter, and Mrs. Patterson’s children Pat and Catherine, as well as Catherine’s children.  After enjoying the exhibit, we walked over to the South Caroliniana Library to see Senator Johnston’s historic desk, which is installed in the Manuscripts Division reading room—the Olin D. Johnston Memorial Room.  Coincidentally, it was exactly forty-five years to the day since the University dedicated this room.

The dedication honored the former governor and U.S. Senator, who died in 1965, and whose papers formed the first major congressional collection ever received by the University.  It also honored friends of Sen. Johnston for their success in endowing a professorship in political science at USC.  The fundraising campaign, chaired by Congressman Robert Hemphill, raised nearly $100,000, a huge sum in the 1960s.

U.S. Senator Ernest F. “Fritz” Hollings, fresh from winning his first full Senate term, attended the dedication, and Governor Robert E. McNair delivered the address.  McNair praised Johnston “as a friend and a great teacher in the art of serving our fellow man.”  He noted that Johnston was “a man who championed difficult causes,” and was devoted to the working class on the farm and in the mills.

Senator Olin Johnston and his daughter, Liz.

Senator Olin Johnston and his daughter, Liz.

The papers of Johnston, Hemphill, Hollings, and McNair form core holdings of SCPC.

Mrs. Patterson also visited us last week with husband Dwight and a friend and toured the exhibit.  She is an inspirational figure and all of our staff and students enjoyed this opportunity to visit and hear stories of her life and public service.

 

Contributed by Herb Hartsook

 

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Spence and the Sunbelt Caucus

Congressman Spence

Congressman Spence

Our good friend Craig Metz, former chief of staff to Congressman Floyd Spence (1928-2001), pointed out that the Carl Albert Center includes among its holdings the papers of the Congressional Sunbelt Caucus.  Eleven feet of papers, chiefly 1981 to 1982 and 1987 to 1994, document the efforts of this bipartisan coalition of Southern and Southwestern representatives.  Mr. Spence was its first vice-chair.  The caucus proposed and tracked legislation for the Sunbelt states, and also advocated for more federal funding targeting the region.

 

The Albert Center was established in 1979 and holds a broad range of political collections consisting of over sixty collections ranging in size from 0.25 to 697 feet.  The Center also has a very active programming component.

Our Spence collection consists of some 74 feet of material, c. 1928-2001, and researchers studying the Caucus will find listed on our description, which is available on our website, seven folders of papers relating to the Caucus, 1981 to 1989.

Spence at the 1976 Republican National Convention

Spence at the 1976 Republican National Convention

 

I will never forget, when we first established SCPC, we wrote to each member of the South Carolina delegation, inviting them to entrust their papers to us.  Mr. Spence called me the day the letter arrived and asked what he could do to help us.  I responded that he could designate us as his repository.  He replied, “Done, what more can I do?”  A great gentleman!

 

 –Contributed by Herb Hartsook

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“Passing the Torch”

treadwell001

Dr. Henrie Treadwell

On Mar. 27, the I. DeQuincey Newman Institute for Peace and Social Justice, The College of Social Work, and the African American Studies Program presented an excellent program featuring a speech by Henrie Treadwell titled, “Passing the Torch: Civil Rights Agenda for the 21st Century.”   Dr. Treadwell addressed concerns over our educational, court and particularly prison systems.  Males of color, African Americans and Hispanics, are disproportionately suspended and expelled from school; often treated by the courts, while juveniles, as adults; and disproportionately imprisoned, leading to a society in which 1 in 3 African American males born today can expect to spend time in prison during their lifetime.  It was a powerful presentation in which Treadwell challenged the audience to take action.  Her aunt Modjeska would have been so proud of her.

The College of Social Work kindly invited SCPC to mount an exhibit and, as we have once before for them, we displayed a selection from the papers of the Rev. Newman, and added materials from the papers of Dr. Treadwell’s aunt, Civil Rights leader Modjeska Simkins, and also material on Treadwell herself.  Thanks to the generosity and sense of history shared by Mrs. Simkins’ family, her papers are preserved and made available for study at SCPC.  Since their donation, Dr. Treadwell has taken an active interest in our program and become a great friend.  It has been gratifying to see her recognized for her role in desegregating USC in 1963.

I. DeQuincey Newman

The event was held at USC’s Spigner House and drew a crowd of about eighty, filling Spigner, and including an impressive showing of students enrolled in the College.  Professor Bobby Donaldson was in attendance and brought images gathered by him while heading the Columbia SC 63 desegregation project.  Emily Newman, the Rev. Newman’s daughter and donor of the Newman papers, was also in attendance.  The April release by USC Press of Prof. Sadye Logan’s book, The Spirit of an Activist: The Life and Work of I. DeQuincey Newman, was announced.  I am eager to see it.

I was very impressed by the student turnout and the close relationship evidenced by the students and the College faculty.  And Dean Anna Scheyett made most eloquent closing remarks to end a very successful evening.  I don’t know that anything I do is more satisfying than when I serve have the opportunity to serve as the public face of SCPC at an event like this.

–Contributed by Herb Hartsook

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The United States Congress: The First 225 Years

See more at: http://congressweek.org/#sthash.aZquOnXr.dpuf

See more at: http://congressweek.org/#sthash.aZquOnXr.dpuf

The week of April 1, 2014, will be celebrated as Congress Week, as sponsored by the Association of Centers for the Study of Congress.

SCPC is one of just over forty institutional members of this organization, which is dedicated to preserving material documenting the work of Congress and encouraging research in those holdings.

Many of the institutions are repositories holding the papers of members of Congress.  Some, like SCPC and the Russell Library at UGA, collect broadly.  Others, like the Dole Institute at KU and the Byrd Center at Shepherd University stress public programming on current events or issues such as leadership.    The National Archives’ Center for Legislative Archives is also a prominent member.

You can learn more about ACSC by visiting its web site: http://www.congresscenters.org/

In publicizing Congress Week, ACSC president Frank Mackaman, of the Dirksen Center, wrote:

The United States Congress is 225 years old this year and we think this is cause for celebration and reflection….We want to encourage a focus on Congress each year during the month of April, the month in 1789 when Congress first got down to the business of governing the United States under its new Constitution….

    While Congress is a co-equal branch of government, the action today seems to be embodied in the president, not Congress. We have President’s Day every year, we conduct grand inaugural events when presidents are sworn in, and the news tends to focus on the president as the one individual who should govern the nation. Yet when each new Congress convenes every two years, the public pays hardly a nod to the event.  So Congress Week is a device, a non-partisan reminder, that Congress bears co-equal responsibility for governing the nation. Its rich and colorful history needs more of the nation’s attention.

    In coming years we hope Congress Week will spark a closer examination of the First Branch of government, encourage schools to develop programs to highlight the work of Congress, and stimulate more scholarly research into Congress by a wide range of disciplines.

    Congress has governed the nation for 225 years, and we hope it will survive and thrive for centuries to come. It can only do so if the nation continues to understand and appreciate the Constitution of the United States and the meaning of representative democracy.  James Madison and other founders believed strongly that an informed citizenry was the best hope for good government. We hope Congress Week will contribute to an informed citizenry.

SCPC currently holds the papers of some twenty-five members of Congress serving primarily in the post-World War II era, including those of current members, Senator Lindsey Graham and Congressmen Mark Sanford and Joe Wilson.  Our sister institution, the South Caroliniana Library, holds the papers of a number of members who served before 1945.  We value these papers not only for their documentation of government but because they help document in a very personal manner the lives, hopes, and fears of the people of South Carolina and our country through the letters, emails and other messages they send to their representatives in government, hoping to sway the legislative process and make all of our lives better.

As Mackaman wrote, “the great experiment in representative democracy is still an ongoing process.”

So, please join us during this first week of April in celebrating Congress Week!

–Contributed by Herb Hartsook

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Congress Week Exhibit: Early Congressmen and women in South Carolina

In celebration of Congress Week, I was designated to design our monthly exhibit for April, to be centered around early Congressional elections. This topic gave me a broad variety of collections to choose from, and a variety of approaches to take. I decided to work with our three earliest Congressional collections. My aim in assembling this exhibit was to demonstrate the broad range of subjects and materials available at the South Carolina Political Collections, even within collections from as far back as eighty years ago.

gasque

Allard Henry Gasque
Sixth District Congressman
1923-1938

The three collections I chose to work with were those of Allard Henry Gasque, Butler Black Hare, and Thomas and Clara McMillan, all working before and throughout the Great Depression. The exhibit includes materials relating to agriculture and agricultural assistance and Philippine independence as well as photographs and biographical articles.

You can stop by and see the exhibit in the Hollings Library on weekdays from 8:30am to 5pm. It will be just outside the entrance to the South Carolina Political Collections gallery.

Contributed by graduate student assistant Clara Bertagnolli

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