National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day (01/09/18)

In honor of National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day, I’d like to highlight the images from William D. Workman’s collection that document the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED).

Exterior views of a two-story brick building.

SLED headquarters and barracks in 1947.

According to Hugh Munn’s entry titled “South Carolina Law Enforcement Division” in the  South Carolina Encyclopedia, SLED was created in 1947 by executive order of then-governor Strom Thurmond. Loosely modeled after the Federal Bureau of Investigation, SLED replaced the South Carolina State Constabulary and served as a “crime-fighting organization with statewide authority.”

A man in a white dress shirt and tie sits at a desk.

The first chief of SLED, Joel D. Townsend, at his desk on August 13, 1947—the year of the agency’s founding.

Workman’s collection contains photographs of the original headquarters and barracks,some of the organization’s founding members (including its first chief Joel D. Townsend), and a scientific criminal investigation seminar conducted at the SLED barracks in 1956.

A man in a dark suit stands at a podium in front of a blackboard.

Governor George Bell Timmerman, Jr. giving a lecture at the Law Enforcement Seminar.

According to “Police Going to School,” an article published on December 10, 1956, in The Columbia Record, the seminar was the “first of its kind.” Led by SLED officials, it provided training for South Carolina law enforcement officers on aids to investigation, interrogation, and examination. Some of the training programs documented in Workman’s photographs include polygraph machines, ballistic examinations, chemical testing, diving gear, and K-9 units.

In addition to the SLED photographs discussed above, Workman also captured images of law enforcement officers from the Charleston Police Department in 1937, the South Carolina Forestry Commission in 1951, and the Barnwell Police Department in 1952.

By Mae Howe

 

Top to bottom: black-and-white illustration of eagle statue, text: "National Archives," divider, text: "National Historical Publications and Records Commission."Reprocessing and digitization of the William D. Workman, Jr. Papers photographs has been made possible by a grant from the National Historical Publications & Records Commission.

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Reprocessing and Digitizing the William D. Workman, Jr. Papers Photographs: Happy New Year!

 

Two small children and a woman, all in winter dress, stand in front of a tree. The ground is covered in snow. A goose or duck is seen walking through the foreground. Charleston harbor or a beach appears to be visible in the background.

Heber Rhea “Tommie” Workman and children, 1940s

The first three months of our NHPRC-funded grant project, Reprocessing and Digitizing the William D. Workman, Jr. Papers Photographs, have been highly productive. As a result of Mae’s diligent and efficient work, the project is more than a month ahead of schedule. That makes the New Year a happy one for this project director.

As Mae wrote in her last blog post, she has finished reorganizing over 3,000 photographs and moved them into better storage enclosures. She has also added a lot of topical information about the photos to the finding aid, which will make it easier for users to locate relevant images in the collection. During the first part of January, we’ll finalize these changes and update the finding aid and other collection access points.

January also marks the start of the project’s next phase:  creation of a digital collection of the images. Mae will scan photos, enter metadata, and prepare a digital collection webpage. After we start uploading images, we will invite people to add information about them in the digital collection’s comments section. This will be SCPC’s first time crowd-sourcing information about collection materials. We are interested to see how it goes.

Top to bottom: black-and-white illustration of eagle statue, text: "National Archives," divider, text: "National Historical Publications and Records Commission."By the time this project concludes in August 2018, the Workman Papers photographs will be easier to use than ever before. We are grateful for the National Historical Publications & Records Commission’s support in making this rich trove of materials easier for scholars, students, and other users to engage with, whether they’re in our reading room or their living rooms. (Speaking of the reading room, the Hollings Library will reopen at 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday, January 2.)

Happy New Year!

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Reprocessing the William D. Workman Jr. Papers Photographs: Rehousing Almost Complete

In my last update, the reprocessing of the William D. Workman Papers’ photographic materials was well underway. I had finished rearranging and rehousing all of the slides, standard prints, and contact prints and had begun working on the negatives.

Three different sized boxes for housing photographic materials sit open on a table. Enclosures containing negatives are visible in the boxes. In front of each box is an example of the type of enclosure it contains.

The three different kinds of enclosures we used for negatives. From left: four flap enclosures for damaged negatives, acid-free envelopes for standard-size undamaged negatives, and sleeves and envelopes for undamaged 35 mm negatives.

This photographic subseries has about 2,000 negatives that are divided into two primary groups—damaged and undamaged—according to their level of deterioration. The undamaged negatives are also divided by size into 35 mm protective enclosures and standard archival envelopes. Initially, I hoped to finish rehousing at least half of these negatives by the end of the year. However, I am happy to report that I have already completed this step.

The flaps of a four flap enclosure sit open to show a negative with visible emulsion bubbling inside.

A damaged acetate negative inside of its four-flap enclosure. This type of enclosure gives damaged negatives stability and protection from further damage.

Although I finished rearranging the images in accordance with the processing plan, transferring them to more protective archival enclosures, and labeling them individually, the physical reprocessing of this subseries is not yet complete. Since my initial processing plan has undergone slight revisions throughout its implementation, it needs to be reviewed and approved by my supervisors. Then, I need to add my processing plan to the finding aid and update its scope and content note to accurately reflect the photographic subseries. Finally, I need to update the collection’s ArchivesSpace record, label and renumber the boxes, and shelve the collection.

By mid-January, I hope to have all of these tasks completed so that I can begin the next step of this project: digitization. 

Reprocessing and digitization of the William D. Workman, Jr. Papers photographs has been made possible by a grant from the National Historical Publications & Records Commission.

By Mae Howe

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Herb Hartsook: Reflections on a Career

Herb Hartsook

Herb Hartsook

Dean of Libraries Tom McNally has pleased us all by the announcement that Associate Director Dorothy Walker will succeed me as Director of SCPC.  I retire at the end of December and Dorothy will take over on January 2.  Her expertise, judgment, and demeanor make her the perfect choice.  Good things are in the offing.  I’m sure you join me in my excitement to see where Dorothy will lead SCPC. 

I hope you will indulge my reflections on 38 years spent helping to preserve the history of our state.  I have thoroughly enjoyed my career and will miss the work and even more, the interaction with donors, co-workers, and the scholars that use our collections. 

Dorothy Walker

Dorothy Walker

I was a part of the first generation of formally trained archivists.  I graduated with a degree in History–The Administration of Archives from the University of Michigan and came to South Carolina in November, 1979, to accept a job with the South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

In 1979, the state Archives was a large organization with a terrifically bright group of young middle-managers.  I received priceless mentoring from these archivists during my four years overseeing work on the pre-Civil War papers of the state legislature.  When an opening occurred at the South Caroliniana Library as its Curator of Manuscripts, I jumped at the opportunity to return to academia and work with their remarkably rich and diverse holdings. 

Olin D Johnston

Olin D. Johnston

SCL was all I had hoped for.  Their largest collection, the papers of former governor and US senator, Olin Johnston, consisted of over 500 feet of materials which basically was untouched since they were acquired after his untimely death in 1965.  The Johnston collection became my special project.  I stole time from my routine duties to work with it, not knowing that I was setting the stage for the remainder of my career at USC Libraries. 

USC approached Senator “Fritz” Hollings in 1989 seeking his papers.  Over the next two years, I schooled myself in the nascent archival specialization of congressional collecting, while helping then library dean George Terry to develop USC’s proposal.  Hollings’ decision and Terry’s vision has resulted in the SCPC that we know today — numerous diverse collections documenting modern society and government, housed in a state-of-the-art building. 

Hollings’ papers form our signature collection and I am proud to have devoted so much of my life to documenting his work and contributions to South Carolina and the nation. 

Regular readers know my blogs typically reflect something current, so I’ll digress from this reflection for a moment.  I recently spoke with Dr. Alan Blum, a distinguished medical doctor who has created a remarkable archive at the University of Alabama documenting smoking in America.  He sent me a copy of a letter to the editor he had written as a teenager in 1964.  He had attended a rally in Woodmere, NY for Senate candidate Robert Kennedy.  His letter excoriated the audience for their rude welcome of one of the speakers,

Fritz Hollings

Gov. Fritz Hollings, 1960

the former governor of South Carolina (a handsome, dynamic, movie-star type whose name escapes me.  The jeers which greeted him all came after the mention of the words “South Carolina.”  Shocked, I looked around, and to my amazement saw about 100 teenagers throughout the crowd booing away at this person they had probably never heard of.  To those northern teenagers, the mere mention or association of “the South” connoted, simply, “bad.”  Does this myth of the southern states being so anti-progress, anti-liberal, and especially anti-civil rights actually pass for fact in the mind of the so-called more aware and more keenly intellectual northerner? 

Hollings is a powerful speaker so I was not surprised that Dr. Blum, on learning that we held the Hollings Collection, was immediately transported to a chill autumn day and memories of Hollings’ eloquent support for his friend, Bobby Kennedy.  All this brings me back to my joy and pride in reviewing my career and my association with Sen. Hollings and our other donors. 

I have enjoyed writing my various blogs and sharing my experiences and thoughts through these posts.  And I will miss the good work done in SCPC and the relationships that we craft with our donors in documenting their careers and contributions.  Best wishes to our fine staff and our wonderful donors! 

Hartsook and Hollings

Herb with Fritz and Peatsy Hollings in April 2000

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Christmas on the Potomac 2017

Nixon christmas card

Richard and Pat Nixon’s card for Christmas 1971; it depicts Washington and architect James Hoban discussing progress on the first White House, 1798.

For years, SCPC has mounted an annual holiday exhibit to showcase cards from its holdings.  It all began when, in processing the papers of former congressman Bryan Dorn in the 1980s, we discovered three cartons of Christmas cards sent to Dorn while he was in Congress — hundreds of cards sent by luminaries like presidents Eisenhower and Nixon, governors Don Russell and Bob McNair, foreign dignitaries, other leaders in Congress, businesses and organizations across South Carolina and the nation, and many constituents.  They were fascinating and we felt our public would enjoy seeing them as much as we did.

A holiday tradition was born and we now actively seek cards sent and received by our donors.  My final holiday exhibit will go up Dec. 1.  In it, I am sharing some of my favorite cards from across the years. 

Clinton card

Bill and Hillary Clinton’s 12″ x 13″ card, North Portico of the White House, 1999

Presidential cards are always fun and you’ll see one of the mammoth cards sent to members of Congress by President Clinton along with four other favorite presidential cards.  USC presidents also take great care in designing their cards.  Picking favorites was difficult, but I persevered and you’ll see several favorite USC cards. 

Early on, we noticed that cards sent by members of Congress seemed to feature either scenes of the Capitol in winter or family photos.  The latter often included family pets.  Years later, in processing the papers of Butler Derrick, we learned that this was a formal recommendation.  We came across, if memory serves, a 1975 note from the House Stationery Office which suggested those exact options to freshman members.  Over the years, we have shown in the exhibit beautiful scenes of the Capitol as well as fun family photos sent by members of the South Carolina delegation and other leaders in Congress.  Fritz Hollings usually sent a Thanksgiving card with original art by a nephew.   Two of these will be exhibited.

Tim Scott card

Senator Tim Scott’s 2014 Christmas card featuring his family

Businesses and organizations often show great creativity in their cards.  Michelin’s usually feature the iconic “Michelin Man.”  

We hope you will visit and that our exhibit, located on the main floor at the front of Thomas Cooper Library, might help put you in the holiday spirit.

By Herb Hartsook

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The Life and Legacy of Bill Workman

William Workman

William D. Workman, Jr. comparing the size of the U.S. Constitution and the federal budget’s Appendix volume.

We’ve written several posts about the life and times of William D. Workman, Jr. Today, I want to pause to acknowledge the anniversary of his death and to reflect on his life and legacy. Bill Workman, as he was known, passed away at the age of 76 on November 23, 1990. He was preceded in death by his wife, Rhea Thomas Workman, and parents, Major William Douglas and Vivian Watkins Workman. He was survived by his sister, Virginia Workman; son, William D. Workman III; daughter, Dee Workman; “and four grandchildren.”[1]

Workman is best remembered for his 1962 Senate campaign, his career as a journalist, and the books he authored. His Senate campaign, “though unsuccessful, is credited with establishing the structure for a viable Republican Party in South Carolina.”[2] As a newspaper journalist, he had a long and distinguished career, during which he covered politics, government, and other aspects of life in South Carolina for several papers, wrote a widely syndicated column, served as the editor of The State from 1966 to 1972, and “served as president of the S.C. Press Association in 1971.”[3] Workman also authored or contributed to a number of books. Arguably, the most important of these is The Case for the South, which provided a significant argument in favor of segregation and garnered national press coverage following its publication in 1960.[4]

William D. Workman, Jr. wearing a World War II-era U.S. Army uniform.

William D. Workman, Jr.

Perhaps less well known is Workman’s substantial record of service. He served on active duty with the U.S. Army from 1940 to 1945. After being demobilized, he continued his military career in the Army Reserve, rising to the rank of colonel and serving as “commanding officer of the 108th Infantry Division (Training).”[5] He was awarded the Legion of Merit upon his retirement in 1965.[6] In 1966, Workman was appointed to “the state’s Constitutional Revision Committee,” whose “1969 report led to significant changes in the operation of local and county government.”[7] His other significant leadership roles included service as “president of the Association of Citadel Men in 1952-1953,”[8] and as a member of the James F. Byrnes Foundation’s board of directors from 1972 to 1985.[9] [10] The Byrnes Foundation funds college scholarships for South Carolina residents who “have lost either one or both parents.”[11] He and his wife “were founding members of Trenholm Road United Methodist Church and were active members of its adult Sunday school class, which they frequently taught.”[12]

Dee Workman and William D. Workman stand shoulder to shoulder on the stage of the 1962 South Carolina Republican Convention. They are smiling and appear to be looking toward each other.

Dee and William D. Workman, Jr. at the South Carolina Republican Convention. Columbia, SC. March 17, 1962. “Dick” Beebout/The State & The Columbia Record

Bill Workman effectively harnessed his considerable intelligence and energy not only to build a successful career as a journalist, but also to make substantive contributions to the development of a two-party system in South Carolina, the protection of the United States, the modernization of the state government, and the success of the private organizations with which he was affiliated. Democrat John West, who chaired the Constitutional Revision Committee while serving as Lieutenant Governor and had known Workman since World War II, said after his passing, “[h]e was a great citizen and a great friend….South Carolina is better for his having been here and serving the state as he did.”[13]

 

[1] Charles Wickenberg, Jr., “Journalist, GOP Crusader William Workman Dies,” State (Columbia, SC), Nov. 24, 1990.

[2] Colleen Bradley and Kelly Gilbert, “Biographical Note,” William D. Workman, Jr. Papers (PDF finding aid), (2002) : 3, http://library.sc.edu/file/380.

[3] Wickenberg, “Journalist, GOP Crusader William Workman Dies.”

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Bradley and Gilbert, “Biographical Note,” 3.

[8] Wickenberg, “Journalist, GOP Crusader William Workman Dies.”

[9] Bradley and Gilbert, “Biographical Note,” 3.

[10] “The James F. Byrnes Foundation,” Byrnes Scholars, accessed November 22, 2017. http://www.byrnesscholars.org/foundation/foundation.php

[11] Ibid.

[12] Wickenberg, “Journalist, GOP Crusader William Workman Dies.”

[13] Ibid.

 

Reprocessing and digitization of the William D. Workman, Jr. Papers photographs has been made possible by a grant from the National Historic Publications & Records Commission.

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In Honor of Veterans’ Day: The Military Career of William D. Workman Jr.

William D. Workman, Jr. wearing a World War II-era U.S. Army uniform.

William D. Workman, Jr.

Although we are grateful for our veterans every day of the year, Veterans’ Day provides an excellent opportunity to give special recognition to all who have served in the United States Armed Forces.

In celebration of Veterans’ Day, I’d like to draw attention to the unique contributions that William D. Workman’s collection offers to the canon of military history from his thirty years of military service, first as an intelligence officer during World War II, then as a Reservist.

Called to active duty by the U.S. Army in 1940, Workman’s wartime service as an intelligence officer included tours in the United States, England, North Africa and the Pacific. This chapter of Workman’s life is visually documented by hundreds of prints, slides, and negatives from places such as Hawaii, Aircraft Recognition School in the United Kingdom, Camp Davis Army Air Field in North Carolina, Fort Barrancas in Florida, and Fort Leavenworth in Kansas.

About 36 people, mostly men, in four rows. People pictured are wearing a variety of different military uniforms.

“37th Class—Aircraft Recognition School, 10th Light AA Training Reg’t; RA. North Barracks; Deepcut, Hampshire. Aug. 26—Sept. 8, 1942.” [Workman is fourth from the right on first row]

Three men in World War II-era military uniforms, standing in front of a wall, underneath a sign identifying their location as Atar, Mauritania.

William D. Workman, Jr. and two fellow soldiers stationed in North Africa during World War II.

Photograph of a World War II-era German military airplane in flight.

World War II aircraft recognition card from London’s Valentine & Sons’ “Proficiency Test” Series (front)

In addition to photographs, Workman preserved pamphlets from his time abroad, a series of sixty-three World War II aircraft recognition cards from London’s Valentine & Sons, and a 1942 bound volume of America’s Alertmen, a weekly newspaper for the Anti-Aircraft Artillery Command, Eastern Theater of Operations. Workman’s collection also contains bound publications from both the 71st Coast Anti-Aircraft Artillery of Fort Story, Virginia and the 76th Coast Anti-Aircraft Artillery of Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

 

Three men in World War I-era U.S. military uniforms pose on a motorcycle in front of a row of military tents.

Sam Willis, Frank Cureton, and William D. Workman. Members of The Butler Guard from Greenville, SC in the Spring of 1917 at Camp Styx—Columbia, South Carolina.

While the existing finding aid highlights some of these materials, one of the hidden gems uncovered in our reprocessing project is a collection of twenty-two World War I photographs of The Butler Guard from Greenville, South Carolina. According to an article published in the Greenville News on November 27, 1917, Workman’s father, William D. Workman, Sr. (1889-1957), served as captain of this company. The Greenville News also adds that the Butler Guard was mobilized in April of 1917 and “helped break the ‘impregnable’ Hindenburg Line” as Company A of the 118th Infantry Regiment.”

The Butler Guard from Greenville, SC, c. 1917

Although we are not digitizing manuscripts for this particular project, it is worth noting that Workman’s collection also contains an extensive series of wartime letters from his father-in-law, Heber Thomas (1889-1959), to Thomas’ fiancée and later wife, Ruth (Dorrill) Thomas. For more information on this selection, please see the finding aid. If you’d like to view these materials, please review the Researcher Information available on SCPC’s website and contact us to schedule a visit.

A young white man in a World War I-era U.S. military uniform stands with one foot slightly forward.

Portrait of Heber E. Thomas in France during World War I, c. 1918-1919

 

By Mae Howe

Reprocessing and digitization of the William D. Workman, Jr. Papers photographs has been made possible by a grant from the National Historic Publications & Records Commission.

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The Senate Campaign of William D. Workman, Jr.

A white man with dark hair, wearing eyeglasses and dark suit, stands behind a podium equipped with microphones. A painting of an elephant with a G.O.P. banner on its back is partially visible in the background.

William D. Workman standing at a podium at the Republican State Convention. Columbia, SC. March 17, 1962. “Dick” Beebout/The State & The Columbia Record

This past Monday marked the 55th anniversary of South Carolina’s 1962 US Senate election, in which Democratic incumbent Olin D. Johnston defeated Republican contender William D. Workman, Jr. Although unsuccessful, Workman’s “campaign was the first significant Republican challenge [to Democratic dominance] in an important statewide race since Reconstruction” and “is credited with establishing the structure for a viable Republican Party in South Carolina.”[1] Having secured 43% of the vote, Workman’s campaign also served as a harbinger of Republican ascendancy in a South Carolina that was then still part of the “Solid South.”

Workman was nominated at the Republican State Convention in Columbia on March 17, 1962. He was already relatively well-known in the state as a journalist and the author of the book The Case for the South, although he had resigned from his positions with the (Charleston) News and Courier and The Greenville News in December 1961 in order to actively pursue the Republican nomination. He further increased his name recognition by speaking to voters around the state and through the campaign’s press activities, which included television broadcasts, press releases, and campaign ads. He was aided by substantial support from the state party and by former President Eisenhower’s visit to South Carolina to endorse his candidacy.

Workman campaigned on a platform of individual liberty, limited government, fiscal conservatism, military strength, free trade, limited involvement in international affairs, and the maintenance of segregated schools. He cast himself in opposition to a Democratic administration whose liberal policies, he felt, threatened the country:

 

What we do here today binds all of us together in a great cause—a cause which is far greater than the sum of its parts. This cause is the preservation—indeed, the restoration—of the American form of government as we have come to cherish it.

For today—make no mistake about this—this form of government is on trial for its life. I confess that I read a sinister meaning into Pres. Kennedy’s inaugural words that ‘we shall have to test anew whether a nation organized and governed such as ours can endure.’

Our endurance is indeed being tested—day by day, week by week, month by month—as a Democratic administration seeks to undermine the political institutions which made this country great.

The concepts of states’ rights and of local self-government are being swallowed up in a determined drive to concentrate all power in Washington.

The principles of free enterprise, individual initiative, and personal thrift are being smothered by confiscatory taxation and governmental regulation.

The goal of ‘a wise and frugal’ government is lost amidst spending policies which look upon money as the universal solvent.

The liberty of the individual is being sacrificed on the altar of governmental control. [emphases original][2]

 

Workman’s message resonated with a lot of voters, as evidenced by his capturing more than 40% of the vote. His campaign spurred the growth of the Republican Party at the local level, providing the state party with a framework on which to expand its activities.

After the election, Workman returned to his journalism career. He became an assistant editor, and later the editor, of The State newspaper. He only sought public office once more, in an unsuccessful run for governor against incumbent Richard W. Riley in 1982.

Five men with elephant-shaped name tags on their suits.

William D. Workman and four unidentified men at a Republican rally. Lexington, SC. December 9, 1961. “Dick” Beebout/The State & The Columbia Record

 

[1] Colleen Bradley and Kelly Gilbert, “Biographical Note,” William D. Workman, Jr. Papers (PDF finding aid), (2002) : 3, http://library.sc.edu/file/380.

[2] William D. Workman, Jr., “Acceptance Speech of William D. Workman, Jr. on Being Nominated as the Republican Candidate for the U. S. Senate,” in For U. S. Senate:  South Carolina’s Bill Workman, and the 1962 Platform of the South Carolina Republican Party, (n.p. : n.p., 1962).

 

Photographs documenting William D. Workman’s Senate campaign are among those that will be made more available through the project Reprocessing and Digitizing the William D. Workman, Jr. Papers Photographs. This project has been made possible by a grant from the National Historic Publications & Records Commission.

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Reprocessing the William D. Workman Jr. Papers Photographs: Rehousing

When I last posted, the processing plan for the William D. Workman Papers’ photographic materials had just been approved. This document outlined a plan for improving access to the materials by altering the existing finding aid’s organization and further developing its level of detail.

Since then, I have begun physically rearranging the images in accordance with the processing plan and transferring them to more protective archival enclosures. Before this process, all of the images were grouped together in large folders. As you can see in the photographs provided, each image has been transferred to its own acid-free envelope and placed in a specific box according to size and type.

As expected, the initial plan has needed minor revisions, but overall its description and arrangement have been easy to implement and exceedingly useful. In fact, the finding aid’s improved accessibility has already proven to be helpful in responding to the requests of three South Carolina researchers—a journalist working on an anthology of essays, an historian finishing up a collection of oral histories, and a director in the post-production phase of her documentary.

The rehousing of slides, standard prints, and contact prints is complete and I began working on the negatives on Tuesday. I am happy to report that over 50% of the physical reprocessing is complete and we are currently about a month ahead of schedule.

In the coming month, I hope to finish rehousing at least half of Workman’s negatives—there are about 2,000 total and each must be handled with caution and labeled individually. Also, we plan to share more of our findings through both the blog and our social media outlets—so make sure you’re following the South Carolina Political Collections on Facebook and Twitter!

By Mae Howe

Reprocessing and digitization of the William D. Workman, Jr. Papers photographs has been made possible by a grant from the National Historic Publications & Records Commission.

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Reprocessing and Digitizing the William D. Workman, Jr. Papers Photographs: Beach Music

On October 22, 1960, the Drifters’ beach music classic, “Save the Last Dance For Me,” reached the number one spot on the Billboard Hot 100. According to the South Carolina Encyclopedia, “[b]each music, as it is known in the South, originated in the coastal Carolinas in the years following World War II.” The encyclopedia entry goes on to detail the origins and evolution of the genre. Beach music is particularly associated with Myrtle Beach and Ocean Drive, which is now part of North Myrtle Beach.

Below are two of William D. Workman’s images of the area in the 1940s, when beach music was born. Each picture is followed by a Google Maps Street View image of the same location in 2017. Of particular interest is Workman’s photo of the Roberts Pavilion. This was one of the early venues for beach music and shag dancing. A historical marker commemorating the pavilion is visible in the Google Maps image of the area.

 

Ocean Drive

Photograph showing the dead end of an unpaved road. Ocean is visible in the background. One and two-story wooden buildings are visible on the left side of the road. Roberts Pavilion, a large, white, three-story building, and a small cafe are visible on the right. Multiple cars are parked near the buildings, as is a greyhound bus. Two unidentified men walk across the picture's middleground.

The Roberts Pavilion and other businesses in the Ocean Drive area. May 27, 1946. Photo by William D. Workman, Jr.

Intersection of Ocean Boulevard and Main Street in North Myrtle Beach, looking toward ocean. Both roads are paved. A modern, multi-story hotel is visible on the left. On the right, a historical marker for the Roberts Pavilion is visible on the street corner. Behind it is a parking lot, with a business in the background.

Same section of Ocean Drive as shown above. January 2017. Google Maps Street View image. Click image to open Google Maps.

 

Myrtle Beach

Photograph of a wide, unpaved road. Road curves to right in background. Businesses visible on the left side of the road include gas stations, a restaurant, and a two-story brick bank. Two gas stations and two restaurants are visible on the right-hand side of the road. Other buildings are visible in the picture's background. 1940s-era cars are traveling down both sides of the road. Cars are also packed in front of the the businesses along the road.

Businesses along SC-17 in Myrtle Beach. August 5, 1947. Photo by William D. Workman, Jr.

View of SC-17 Business and US-501 where they fork. In the background, SC-17 veers to the left, while US-501 veers to the right. No businesses are visible on the left side of the road, only a sidewalk, short grass, and palmetto trees. On the right side of the road there is a sidewalk, beyond which there is a grass lawn and relatively modern-looking one-story businesses. A light-colored, two-story restaurant is visible in the background on the right, where US-501 curves out of sight. This building is also visible in Workman's picture, although in his picture its facade was darker and housed a different restaurant.

Same section of Myrtle Beach as shown above. January 2017. Google Maps Street View image. Click image to open Google Maps.

 

Reprocessing and digitization of the William D. Workman, Jr. Papers photographs has been made possible by a grant from the National Historic Publications & Records Commission.

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