Celebrating Hanukkah in Historical S.C. Newspapers

Illustration of Judas of Maccabee, one of the key figures in the Hanukkah story, in The Tacoma times (Tacoma, Washington).

There are several interesting articles in historical S.C. newspapers that describe the significance, and interesting history, of the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah. As you might know, S.C. has a long and proud Jewish heritage. Its first Jewish settlers immigrated to Charleston in the 1690s!

The Hebrew Feast of Lights, in The daily phoenix (Columbia, S.C.), December 9, 1874

To Celebrate Hanukkah, in The Laurens advertiser (Laurens, S.C.), December 27, 1905

 

The Feast of Lights in The Keowee courier (Walhalla, S.C.), December 21, 1921

 

How the spirit of Christmas and Hanukkah are similar, in The daily phoenix (Columbia, S.C.), January 4, 1873

To search for yourself, try searching variations of the spelling of Hanukkah, like Hanukah or Chanukkah. Also try related items such as Feast of Lights or menorah. I limited my searches to historical S.C. newspapers, but you could try searching these terms by All States. To find more Jewish-related articles in Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers, try searching terms likeĀ  Jewish or Hebrew. Also, you may browse two historical Jewish newspapers digitized in Chronicling America, The Jewish South (Richmond, V.A.) and The Jewish Herald (Houston, T.X.). Happy Hanukkah One and All!

To learn more about the SC Digital Newspaper Project, visit us at http://library.sc.edu/digital/newspaper/index.html.

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One Response to Celebrating Hanukkah in Historical S.C. Newspapers

  1. Matt says:

    That’s really interesting–I had no idea South Carolina had such a legacy of Jewish inhabitants.

    That last clipping is particularly interesting. For some reason I’m surprised to find that such a strong statement of support (“…must be welcomed by every friend of civilization as an advance in the true path of progress.”) in an S.C. newspaper from 1873.

    Thanks for doing the research and sharing it with us!