Feb 13

2014 MIRC Award for Creative Editing Winners Announced

John Phillips

John Phillips

Every year, Moving Image Research Collections gives out Awards for Creative Editing (MIRC ACE) to MART 371 students who complete a class project using content from our collections. We are pleased to announce the 2014 winners: John Phillips (spring semester) and Megan Brooks (fall semester).

Rebecca Boyd, who taught both winners, describes the challenge. “Each semester, we give the MART 371 students a selection of videos from the MIRC archive and ask them each to create a cohesive one minute film. The assignment asks students to make cuts based on graphic, spatial, temporal, content, or rhythmic connections between shots.”

Megan Brooks

Megan Brooks

“In addition to demonstrating the technical skills necessary to chop up the footage and reassemble it,” Boyd continues, “they should demonstrate that they are developing the artistic judgment to take the disparate bits of footage and put them together to say something.” The possibilities for a project of this kind are endless. As Boyd explains, “Some students choose to use the footage to tell a story; others make impressionistic films that evoke an emotion; others adopt a montage style, using juxtaposition of images to create meaning; others make music videos or mockumentaries. It’s always interesting to see how students use identical footage in wildly different ways.”

We at MIRC are perennially surprised by what the students do with the films, and appreciate the chance to recognize the most creative products with the ACE award. “The MIRC editing project is a great way to introduce fledgling filmmakers to the wealth of archival footage we have here on campus. It’s always fascinating to see what the students come up with. This year’s winning pieces, for example, strike very different tones,” says MIRC Director Heather Heckman. The variety of content the students create using the same pool of raw material is incredible, as evidenced by the striking differences in Phillips’ and Brooks’ pieces. John Phillips selected footage that led to a fun final product with unexpected juxtapositions. Megan Brooks went in another direction, creating a hauntingly eerie edit.

Phillips2

Still image from “MIRC-y Waters.”

According to Rebecca Boyd, Phillips’ project, MIRC-y Waters, “makes me think about disproportionate consequences to seemingly mundane actions, and I think he uses the element of surprise very effectively. In nine sections of MART 371, I’ve never had anyone else interpret the footage the way he did. I won’t say more than that because I want your readers to watch and enjoy the film for themselves!”

John Phillips explains how he came up with his final product:My process for that video involved many hours of sifting through the archives. I started by finding clips that had a little bit of a narrative built in. From there I could think of something that might be fun to build on to that. I really just wanted to see what fun stuff I could do with the archival footage. I love putting stuff together in ways that it was never intended to.”

Still image from "MIRC-y Waters."

Still image from “MIRC-y Waters.”

For Phillips, the possibility for manipulation of original intention is one of the benefits of working with archival material. “That’s one of my favorite things about working with footage that isn’t mine. Especially the archival footage in MIRC. A lot of it had really unusual shots that I thought were really neat. Adding the sound effects to that piece was a cool experience. The sounds allowed me to put my own twist on the videos that was never meant to be there.”

Still image from "Ghost Stories."

Still image from “Ghost Stories.”

Megan Brooks took a different approach for her project, Ghost Stories. “When I started, I knew that I didn’t want to attempt to shape the footage around my own vision. Instead, I wanted to find clips in the footage that caught my attention and create something out of them. I instantly fell in love with the clip of the woman advancing on the camera with the upper half of her face cut off by the frame. The look of old footage, the blue tint of the clip, and the absence of her eyes from the frame felt very eerie and almost ghostly. I knew the moment I saw it I wanted to create a video that portrayed that very mood of ghostliness to the audience.”

Still image from "Ghost Stories."

Still image from “Ghost Stories.”

For Rebecca Boyd, “Megan’s film evokes lost memories—things that slip away when you’re trying to recall them but then come back in unbidden snippets, perhaps at inopportune moments. The haunting music that Megan uses works with the images to produce a sense of melancholy, but the kind of nostalgic melancholy that you want to hang onto.”

As far as creating the soundtrack, Brooks “began collecting sound clips that conveyed that feeling to me. I finally decided upon old record scratches, radio static, and an eerie music box song. From that point, I began to play with the footage until I felt it both matched the music I chose and produced the mood I wanted to achieve.”

Like John Phillips, Megan Brooks found working with archival material to be a rewarding experience. “I loved creating something new out of the preexisting footage. It was an opportunity to be creative, have a lot of fun, and shape something that other people could enjoy. I’m very interested in editing again in the future—perhaps in a future career.”

Congratulations to award winners John Phillips and Megan Brooks!

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